‘Forbidden Porcelain’ at the Prinsenhof Museum, Delft

My first experience of Delft was a gloriously sunny Saturday in May, spent walking around the town square; with some serious efforts invested in climbing the tower of the Nieuwe Kerk, the second tallest church tower in the Netherlands.

On my second trip to Delft, I spent the day at the Prinsenhof Museum, browsing through the ‘Forbidden Porcelain: Exclusively for the Emperor’ exhibition.

This exhibition centers around the exquisite porcelain that was made specially for Chinese emperors by the imperial kilns of Jingdezhen, but which was later discarded and destroyed, as it did not meet the high standards expected of royal wares. I was very fortunate to have the company of the museum’s Curator of Decorative Arts, Ms. Suzanne Kluver, who shared her in-depth knowledge of the subject.

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The opening panel of the ‘Forbidden Porcelain: Exclusively for the Emperor’ exhibition

It is the first time that these reassembled porcelain wares, originally made for Chinese emperors, are being seen outside Asia. Several of the artefacts in this exhibition are on loan from the Archaeological Institute, Jingdezhen, China.

In an article for the Jul-Aug’17 issue of PASSAGE, the bimonthly magazine of the Friends of the Museums Singapore, I share about my visit to the Prinsenhof Museum, and briefly explore the centuries-old connection between Chinese porcelain and Delftware.

Please click on the image below to view the PDF of this article.

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(Reproduced with the permission of the Editor.)

So if you happen to be in Delft (or in the vicinity), do consider visiting the ‘Forbidden Porcelain’ exhibition at the Prinsenhof Museum. The exhibition runs until 9th July 3rd September 2017.

Here are some pictures from the Prinsenhof Museum that could not be included in the print article….

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Entrance of the Prinsenhof Museum

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Bullet holes from the 1584 assassination of William I, preserved in a wall of the Prinsenhof

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Sunlight streaming through a window in the basement of the museum

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Loved the look of this window!

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A lamp post adorned with the trademark blue & white delftware designs, on the premises of the museum

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A seat in the Prinsenhof garden embellished with beautiful pieces of delftware

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 Comments

Filed under Europe, Netherlands

3 responses to “‘Forbidden Porcelain’ at the Prinsenhof Museum, Delft

  1. It is interesting how the curiosity in Europe led to such a preservation. And in a way it spurred such an industry such as Delft pottery. The world in the distant past was not as closed out from each other as we suppose!

    Liked by 1 person

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